• 16100 Sand Canyon Avenue #300 Irvine
  • Tues-Thurs: 7:30AM - 4:30PM
  • +1 949 453 9800
  • AshDentalirvine@gmail.com

Ash Dental Irvine FAQ

We are here to answer all your dental health questions and concerns. If you can’t find the answer your question here, please feel free to make an  appointment and talk with a professional who can help.

Cosmetic Dentistry

I don’t like my teeth or my smile – what can I do?

A wide variety of options are available to improve tooth function and how your smile looks. Ask us about what options are available.

I have dental insurance. Will it pay for my new smile?

Most dental insurance has very low total benefits per year, which may offset the cost for regular checkups, but probably won’t pay toward cosmetic services. We will work to maximize your benefits, and may have suggestions for alternative methods of financing so you can obtain the treatment of choice. Learn more about dental insurance and financing.

How many office visits will it take to fix my teeth and improve my smile?

This varies with each individual, depending on the need. Sometimes, you can dramatically improve your oral health and appearance in just a couple of visits. Discuss your goals and concerns, so the best plan can be developed for your individual situation. If you start today, a new smile can be yours sooner than you think.

Is my new smile permanent?

With good home care and regular visits, modern materials can last for many years, and possibly decades. Like most things, excellent maintenance will extend the life of your dental restorations.

How much does it cost to get a great smile?

Like most services, cost varies based on the amount of time required and the difficulty of the procedure(s). Generally, improving a smile requires a combination of treatment options such as bleaching, reshaping gums, and using bonded materials (resin or porcelain) to improve the appearance of the teeth. A great way to start is by having a consultation with our dentist to determine how you can reach your goals.

What are some benefits of cosmetic dentistry?

A great smile should improve your self-confidence, which can have a positive impact on the social and professional aspects of your life. Cosmetic dentistry is not just about pretty smiles though. New techniques and materials are available for back teeth as well as those seen when you smile

What will my new smile look like?

Our dentist will work with you in choosing the right look for you. A smile enhancement can be made to look both dramatic and natural. We can use photographs (in a process called cosmetic imaging) and models to show you what to expect. Sometimes, trial materials can be placed directly on your teeth to help you visualize the chan

Family Dentistry

Are baby teeth really that important to my child?

Primary, or “baby,” teeth are important for many reasons. Not only do they help children speak clearly and chew naturally, they also aid in forming a path that permanent teeth can follow when they are ready to come in.

What should I do if my child has a toothache?

First, rinse the irritated area with warm salt water and place a cold compress on the face if it is swollen. Give the child acetaminophen for any pain, rather than placing aspirin on the teeth or gums. Finally, see a dentist as soon as possible.

How do dental sealants work?

Sealants work by filling in the crevasses on the chewing surfaces of the teeth. This shuts out food particles that could get caught in the teeth, causing cavities. The application is fast and comfortable and can effectively protect teeth for many years.

How do I know if my child is getting enough fluoride?

Have your family dentist evaluate the fluoride level of your child’s primary source of drinking water. If your child is not getting enough fluoride internally through water (especially if the fluoride level is deficient or if your child drinks bottled water without fluoride), then we may prescribe fluoride supplements.

What can I do to protect my teeth during sporting events?

Soft plastic mouthguards can be used to protect teeth, lips, cheeks and gums from sport related injuries. A custom-fitted mouthguard will protect your teeth from injuries and even provide protection from severe injuries to the head.

Dental Implants

I need to replace two missing teeth next to each other. Can I just have one implant placed and attach it to one of my natural teeth and make a bridge?

Generally, this is not a good idea-over the years we have learned that it is generally much better not to attach implants to teeth. We frequently attach implants to each other, which can improve strength and works well. So in a case like this, although it may be more expensive in the short term to place two implants instead of one, the long-term success is likely to be much better with the two implants.

I lost my upper back teeth on one side and have gone for years without doing anything about it. My sinuses always seem to bother me more on that side than on the side that I have back teeth. Could these problems be related to one another?

In a large majority of people who have had their upper back teeth missing for a long period of time is the increasing downward growth of the maxillary sinus. At birth it is the size of a pea, and progressively grows as the skull matures. This growth is at the expense of the surrounding bone. If you are considering replacing those upper back teeth with fixed teeth that stay in all the time, it may be necessary to perform a sinus elevation procedure to allow room for placement of dental implants into this area to support those teeth. This involves placement of bone and/or bone substitutes into an area which was previously occupied by the lower part of the maxillary sinus. Most importantly, this procedure increases the available bone use to place implants and restore the missing back teeth.

I’ve had dentures for several years and have lost a lot of jawbone. My lower dentures are floaters and I need help. Is there still hope for me?

In most cases, with the new options available today in the field of dental implants, some form of treatment can be done. We encourage people to get help as soon as possible if they are already having some problems with their current situation. These problems include: excessive use of denture adhesives, chewing only soft food, unable to taste some foods, constant mouth sores, unhappy with the appearance of one’s teeth and bite position (in some cases the nose and chin getting closer together). The sooner the problems are corrected with dental implants the more choices one has available for treatment. If you have any or all of the above symptoms, implants could very well be the answer for you.

I am missing all of my teeth and am now wearing a full upper and lower denture. I can no longer tolerate my lowers. Will I need an implant for every tooth I am replacing on the lower jaw?

It is not necessary to have an implant for every tooth that is being replaced. The number of implants necessary to provide support depends on the type of implants used and the type of teeth (removable vs. non- removable) that will be attached to the implants. A thorough oral exam and panoramic x-ray is all that is necessary in most cases, to determine which implant can be used and how many must be used. Sometimes additional x-rays or CT scans are used in more complicated cases.

I consulted a dentist several years ago about using dental implants to replace my lower denture and he told me that I did not have adequate bone available to place enough in-the-bone implants without danger of fracturing my now fragile jawbone. Are there any alternatives?

Because of the advances in the field of dental implantology, there are now more choices and techniques. It’s the rare person that cannot receive an implant or a combination of implants. Today we have available many types of implants designed to accommodate multiple problems.

I had a root canal on a tooth that fractured and now it has to be removed. Can it be replaced with an implant or do I have to have a bridge or a partial?

Teeth that have root canals can fracture more easily than other teeth because they are weaker and somewhat dehydrated. They can sometimes be as brittle as glass. In the past the best available treatment was to remove the tooth and file down the adjacent teeth and make a bridge – caps on the adjacent teeth with an attached “dummy” tooth in between. Sometimes this still is the only way. However, in many cases an implant can replace the fractured tooth and no teeth need to be ground down at all.

Teeth Whitening

Does tooth whitening cause permanent tooth sensitivity?

Sensitivity from tooth whitening is always transient. That means if there is any sensitivity caused by the whitening, it goes away within one to two days after the treatment, and the patient returns to the state of sensitivity he or she had prior to starting the whitening process.

Can I get my teeth whitened?

Most people are candidates for tooth whitening, but again, each situation is unique and it’s best to contact your dental professional.

How long does tooth whitening last?

Typically you can expect whitening to last from six months to two years, although some studies report results lasting up to 10 years. Avoiding red wine, coffee, and smoking—all of which can cause staining—helps preserve the results.

Is tooth bleaching safe?

Yes, many studies have proven that tooth whitening is safe. You can protect your tooth enamel by using calcium sulfate and fluoride.

How much does tooth whitening cost?

Prices vary widely for tooth whitening. Over-the-counter kits can cost as little as $20, with extensive in-office procedures approaching up to $1,000. If you want professional whitening, expect the price to be around $300 to $800. If you want an at-home bleaching kit from your dentist, expect to pay between $300 and $600. Learn more about dental insurance and financing.

Does tooth whitening affect fillings, veneers, or crowns?

Tooth whitening has little or no effect on restorative materials such as porcelain or crowns, but it may temporarily reduce the bond strength between enamel and composite restorations. This is why it’s a good idea to check with your dental professional before beginning any course of tooth whitening.

Is the agent used in tooth whitening toxic?

Products developed from carbamide peroxide, hydrogen peroxide, and urea (substances found in every human cell), should be used cautiously to alleviate concern. Those who have issues are the ones who don’t follow instructions and overuse the products for months or years.

Help

Additional Questions

If you can't find the answer for your question, feel free to contact us!

Phone

+1 949 453 9800

Email

info@ashdentslirvine.com

Fax

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